Segments in this Video

Early Dancing Experience (03:51)

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At age 7, Jennifer Muller choreographed her first dance. She joined the Julliard Preparatory division and studied under Alfredo Corvino and Pearl Lang. She matriculated to the Julliard Conservatory, joined Jose Limón's dance company, and toured Asia.

Dancing with Limón (02:36)

Muller choreographed while dancing with Louis Falco. In 1974, she created the Jennifer Muller/The Works Dance Company. When she retired as a dancer, she was surprised at how easy it was to stop dancing professionally.

Costumes Aid the Story (03:05)

Muller choreographed "Miserere Nobis" to Samuel Barber's "Allegeri: Miserere" in 2014. She combined the female company with her scholarship students to create the ensemble. Although it is only 11 minutes long, she feels it is one of her more passionate and organic pieces.

"Miserere Nobis" Part One (05:27)

Watch an excerpt of the performance. It was funded in part by the Harkness Foundation for Dance and The Works New Creation Fund. (Credits)

"Miserere Nobis" Part Two (04:47)

Watch an excerpt of the performance choreographed to Barber's "Allegeri: Miserere." Dancers include: Sonja Chung, Seiko Fujita, Caroline Kehoe, Shiho Tanaka and scholarship students.

Polarity Technique (03:45)

Muller was surprised to learn that Tai Chi is based on the same principles that she teaches her dancers. This technique gives dancers control and flexibility without tension. Muller is proud of how ethnically diverse her company is, having members and alumni from 47 different countries.

Inspiration Behind "Alchemy" (04:50)

In 2015 Muller collaborated with Mark Bolotin on "Alchemy," and wanted the dance to progress through the four elements: air, fire, earth, and water. Muller wanted to convey how individuals do not communicate directly, but through electronic devices.

"Alchemy" Part One (10:01)

Watch the "air" piece of this performance choreographed by Jennifer Muller and inspired by the four elements. Mark Bolotin designed the video projection. (Credits)

"Alchemy" Part Two (04:02)

Watch the "fire" piece of this performance choreographed by Jennifer Muller and inspired by the four elements. Mark Bolotin designed the video projection.

"Alchemy" Part Three (05:27)

Watch the "earth" piece of this performance choreographed by Jennifer Muller and inspired by the four elements. Mark Bolotin designed the video projection.

"Alchemy" Finale (04:36)

Watch the "water" piece of this performance choreographed by Jennifer Muller and inspired by the four elements. Mark Bolotin designed the video projection.

Influential Teachers (03:41)

Muller's mentors include Antony Tudor, Jose Limón, Louis Horst, and Anna Sokolow. She considers herself lucky because she was able to dance both the role of Desdemona and Emilia in Limon's company. Jacob Druckman taught her music analysis at Julliard.

Touring the Globe (03:01)

Muller and Falco aimed to be innovative by concentrating on today's world instead of choosing heroes and villains from the past as inspiration. She incorporated street clothes, dialogue, and walking into her choreography. Johann Ulricht thought she and Pina Bausch revolutionized modern dance.

Unusual Props (03:43)

In "Tub," wet dancers danced around a bathtub— seven people went to the beach and each was miserable in "Beach." Muller has been commissioned by over 29 companies around the globe. "Grass" was inspired by Walt Whitman's ideology that humans are actually one entity.

"Grass" Part One (03:03)

Watch a solo by one of the dancers accompanied by Julia Kent playing the cello. (Credits)

"Grass" Part Two (02:15)

Watch an excerpt of this piece. The dancers perform on artificial turf.

"Grass" Part Three (03:39)

Watch an excerpt of the performance. Dancers include Chellamar Bernard, Roside Lani Fiedelman, Seiko Fujita, Duane Gosa, Gen Hoshimoto, Katherine Hozier, Olivia Jordan, Caroline Kehoe, Shiho Tanaka, and Michael Tomlinson.

"Grass" Part Four (02:41)

Watch a quartet of dancers perfom accompanied by Kent on the cello.

"Grass" Part Five (04:20)

Watch an excerpt of the performance. Dancers include Bernard, Fiedelman, Fujita, Gosa, Hoshimoto, Hozier, Jordan, Kehoe, Tanaka, and Tomlinson.

"Grass" Part Six (03:22)

Watch an excerpt of the performance. The dancers perform on artificial turf.

"Grass" Part Seven (04:34)

Watch an excerpt of the performance. Dancers include Bernard, Fiedelman, Fujita, Gosa, Hoshimoto, Hozier, Jordan, Kehoe, Tanaka, and Tomlinson.

"Grass" Finale (04:36)

Watch the conclusion of the performance. Dancers include Bernard, Fiedelman, Fujita, Gosa, Hoshimoto, Hozier, Jordan, Kehoe, Tanaka, and Tomlinson. The dancers take their curtain call.

Responding to Society and Herself (03:19)

Sometimes Muller is inspired by a visual artist or piece of music, but mostly ideas just come to her. Recurrent themes in her choreography include personal relationships, transformation, social commentary, communication, and conflict resolution.

Full Evening Works (04:42)

"The White Room" confused the dance community, but the theatrical community loved it. When Muller teaches choreography, she explains to her students the work must come from deep inside them. She discusses working with the Verdehr trio on "Helix Rituals."

"Helix Rituals" (09:36)

Watch an excerpt of the performance. Costumes were designed by Sachi Masuda. Dancers include Sonja Chung, Seiko Fujita, Gen Hoshimoto, Caroline Kehoe, Shiho Tanaka, and Michael Tomlinson. (Credits)

The Work Studio (04:23)

Muller gives open houses so patrons of the arts can watch her dancers rehearse. She discusses how she prepares for rehearsals each day and does not tolerate conflict within the studio. "Whew" is a lighthearted dance about how busy people's lives have become.

"Whew" Part One (05:12)

Watch an excerpt of the performance. Dancers include Sonja Chung, Seiko Fujita, Gen Hoshimoto, Caroline Kehoe, Elise King, Michele Tara Lynch, Shiho Tanaka, and Michael Tomlinson. (Credits)

"Whew" Part Two (03:08)

Watch an excerpt of the performance. The music is by Peter Muller.

"Whew" Part Three (02:54)

Watch an excerpt of the performance. Dancers include Chung, Fujita, Hoshimoto, Kehoe, King, Lynch, Tanaka, and Tomlinson.

"Whew" Part Four (06:01)

Watch the conclusion of the performance with music by Peter Muller.

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Jennifer Muller/The Works: Alive & Kicking


DVD (Chaptered) Price: $249.00
DVD + 3-Year Streaming Price: $254.93
3-Year Streaming Price: $249.00

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Description

In this video, Jennifer Muller discusses her background, inspirations, influences, and technique. Watch excerpts from recent choreography: Miserere NobisAlchemyGrassHelix Rituals, and Whew!

Length: 132 minutes

Item#: BVL118150

ISBN: 978-1-63521-398-0

Copyright date: ©2015

Closed Captioned

Performance Rights

Prices include public performance rights.

Not available to Home Video customers.


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