Segments in this Video

"A Superpower No One Can Ignore" (03:39)

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China is set to overtake the U.S. as the world's largest economy; urban migration drives the industrial revolution. China now relies on energy imports and is the EU's largest trading partner. It invests in raw materials in developing countries.

Africa's Natural Resources (05:50)

With Chinese investment, Mozambique is among the fastest growing African economies. Luo Haoping farms rice; smallholders gain Chinese technology and knowledge. China offers rapid development solutions but experts say there is no imperial plan; India and Brazil are also investing in the continent.

"We Must Not Sell Our Future to China" (03:44)

As China’s biggest export market, the EU depends on China for trade, investment, and loans. German politician Elmar Brok discusses balancing economic interest with Western values, including sovereignty. China strategically bought Greek debt in exchange for using the port of Piraeus.

American Misconceptions (02:36)

China's entry into the Latin American market has gone unnoticed. Kenneth Lieberthal says the American manufacturing sector is as large as China's. Legislation restricts Chinese investment in U.S. businesses but China buys U.S. government debt in a codependent relationship.

"When China Wakes She Will Shake the World" (02:42)

Bates Gill doubts China's rise will lead to conflict with the U.S. Deng Xiaoping prioritized industry, trade, and agriculture; military spending is a fraction of America's. China remains a regional power, requiring territorial integrity and defense of economic success.

Strategic Questions (03:01)

The U.S. has shifted military focus to the Pacific. China and the U.S. disagree over Taiwan's sovereignty and there are tensions over territorial waters in the South China Sea. However, armed conflict is unlikely because both are nuclear powers.

Peace through Trade (02:28)

Despite cultural and political differences, the U.S. and China have learned to get along. Gill argues that the greatest threats to China are corruption, inequality, and environmental degradation—byproducts of economic success.

Credits: Inside China 2: China - The Future? (00:03)

Credits: Inside China 2: China - The Future?

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Inside China 2: China - The Future?

Part of the Series : Inside China
3-Year Streaming Price: $169.95

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Description

This program looks at how China is flexing its economic muscle and investing all over the world and considers what this means for the West? It also looks at China's involvement in various African countries and in the European Union and questions if that brings China into conflict with the U.S.

Length: 25 minutes

Item#: BVL128768

Copyright date: ©2014

Closed Captioned

Performance Rights

Prices include public performance rights.

Not available to Home Video customers.


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