Segments in this Video

Part Two: We Are Elected (03:45)

FREE PREVIEW

This program will explore Mary Lincoln's growing fragility and desire for the Presidency. Abraham purchased a home in Springfield Illinois where the couple lived for 17 years, raising a family. Robert Todd Lincoln was born nine months after their wedding.

Lincoln's Career Aspirations (03:40)

Lincoln traveled to cities all over Illinois to increase his legal career. Friends describe how the politician would tell stories to prevent the depression from occurring. Mary remained home with the children and suffered migraines.

Lincoln's Return to Indiana (03:59)

Lincoln returned to the homestead where his mother died and wrote a poem. Citizens elected the politician to the U.S. House of Representatives under the Whig ticket.

Lincoln's Relocation to Washington D.C. (03:16)

The Lincoln family moved into a single room in a crowded boarding house. In the congressional directory, Lincoln wrote "defective" under education. Mary found the city disappointing, fell into debt, and moved with her two sons back to Kentucky.

Lincoln's Growing Frustration (03:15)

No one in Washington DC paid attention to Lincoln proposals or speeches. Listen to excerpts of letters that were exchanged between the couple. Lincoln traveled to New England to support General Zachary Taylor.

Lincoln's One Term in Congress (02:52)

Illinois was overwhelming democratic so Lincoln returned home and withdrew from politics. Eddie Lincoln died from tuberculosis; Mary stopped eating. Lincoln began to learn how to control his depression.

Birth of William Wallace Lincoln (04:14)

Lincoln argued in front of the Illinois Supreme Court for the Central Railroad. Congress passed the fugitive slave law. William Herndon was an abolitionist.

Lincoln's Refusal to Endorse Slavery (03:17)

Stephen A. Douglas proposed the Kansas-Nebraska bill based upon popular sovereignty as a compromise measure. Lincoln believed that slavery should not spread to new territories.

Republican Ticket Formed (02:59)

Lincoln ran for the U.S. Senate and lost. John C. Freemont ran for president. Mary seemed more relaxed now and felt fulfilled by working as a team.

Lincoln's Second Congressional Run (09:19)

Lincoln ran against Douglas for the seat in the U.S. Senate because he did not believe the country should be divided. Listen to excerpts of their debates. Margaret Washington describes how Lincoln did not believe in racial equality.

Lincoln's Nomination (06:16)

Lincoln began traveling across the county speaking on Slavery. William Seward was the front-runner for the Presidential nomination. Lincoln won the third ballot.

1860 Presidential Ticket (05:24)

Voters called Lincoln "Honest Abe" and "The Rail-splitter." Mary entertained in Springfield and talked politics with reporters. Lincoln secured an advantage when the Democratic Party became divided between the North and South.

1860 Election Day (02:58)

Lincoln was elected President of the United States, receiving just 40% of the popular vote. Within 90 days, seven southern states seceded and shattered the United States.

Credits: Abraham and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided - Episode 2 (00:42)

Credits: Abraham and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided - Episode 2

For additional digital leasing and purchase options contact a media consultant at 800-257-5126
(press option 3) or sales@films.com.

Abraham and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided - Episode 2

Part of the Series : Abraham and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided
3-Year Streaming Price: $169.95

Share

Description

The Lincoln marriage is both tempestuous and passionate: she has a temper; he suffers bouts of depression. But they share a powerful political ambition that sends Abraham to the House of Representatives and later, with the country splitting apart over slavery, sees him run for president. On election night, when the results finally come in, Abraham goes home and tells his wife, “Mary, Mary, we are elected!”

Length: 57 minutes

Item#: BVL151402

Copyright date: ©2001

Closed Captioned

Performance Rights

Prices include public performance rights.

Not available to Home Video, Dealer and Publisher customers.

Only available in USA and Canada.


Share